Tag Archives: Iram Parveen Bilal

Alive and Well in Pakistan relaunched – spread the word!

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AliveandWell-front-smDear friends and supporters,

The updated 10th-anniversary edition of my book Alive and Well in Pakistan was launched earlier this month, and I’m now very actively working to give away 3,000 copies to students, opinion leaders, and elected officials around the United States:

  • Dr. Rick Halperin of Southern Methodist University is distributing 1,000 copies to students in SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program and at other institutions nationwide.
  • Pakistani-American friends in the Washington, DC area are making plans to distribute 1,000 copies to members of the U.S. Congress and other influential people in and around the nation’s capital. (I will be visiting Washington, and thanking that community in person, in late September.)
  • Hundreds of students at Texas Christian University will be given copies as part of my participation in  TCU’s campus-wide focus on Central Asia throughout the 2014-15 academic year.
  • Pakistani-Americans in Arlington, Texas will give 100 copies to all Democratic members of the Texas state legislature, and others, at the state party convention in June.
  • Others in Illinois, Arizona and California have taken delivery of copies to give away.

I am hoping to do another printing as soon as August, from which I would give away another 3,000 copies. To do that effectively, I need your help. If you want to help influence mainstream Americans to gain a more accurate and sympathetic human appreciation for Pakistan and Pakistanis through Alive and Well in Pakistan, please contact me.

To purchase your own personal copy for $18.95 plus $3.95 U.S. shipping, use this button:

You also can help by rating or reviewing Alive and Well in Pakistan – the new edition, at this link – on Goodreads. You can also like it on Facebook. I’ll have it for sale on Amazon soon too, but frankly I’d rather you bought it directly from me.  🙂

Many thanks to my wonderfully supportive friends Talat Rashid, Mir Ali and the Chicagoland Pakistani community for hosting a wonderful launch event May 9 at the Bolingbrook Golf Club. Special thanks to Mayor Roger Claar of Bolingbrook, who was kind enough to attend the dinner and to provide a great endorsement printed, along with one from Congressman Chris Van Hollen of Maryland, on the book’s back cover. Thanks also to Faisal Tirmizi, Consul General at the Pakistani consulate in Chicago,  who also attended the dinner.

I’m making plans to print and distribute the new edition in Pakistan. I will try to get it stocked at Saeed Book Bank in Islamabad and other major bookstores, but I also want to give it away to students at Pakistani universities and secondary schools. I can’t make any money from selling books in Pakistan, so I’m glad just to make sure that the new Alive and Well in Pakistan is widely read there. If you are in Pakistan and think you can help, please drop me a note.

Finally, here are links to two recent articles of mine:

 – Ethan

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See acclaimed Pakistani film “Josh” on DVD!

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Josh imageOn March 5, 2013, I had the memorable pleasure of attending the North American premiere of the wonderful Pakistani feature film Josh (English title: Against the Grain). It happened to be in my home city of Seattle, and director Iram Parveen Bilal was present. Josh is the story of Fatima, an elegant and well-bred elite Karachiite who involves herself in village society and politics – thereby endangering herself and others – when she insists on finding out why her beloved maid has gone missing. It’s a cross-cultural story but emphatically a domestic Pakistani one, with minimal reference to the world outside Pakistan. In my review of the film published in the Pakistani newspaper Dawn, I reflected:

Americans are accustomed to seeing other countries, especially Pakistan, as refractions of our own national worries and self-regarding obsessions. That is our problem, not Pakistan’s, and Josh serves us well by declining to pander or spoon-feed. It is a very good film, well conceived and executed on a small budget, and the question in my mind as I left the cinema was whether and how it might be possible to shoehorn such a serious piece of Pakistani storytelling into the awareness of some measurable fraction of the millions who know Pakistan only through TV news and Hollywood movies such as Zero Dark Thirty. I was very nearly the only gora [Westerner] at the Seattle screening.

In a q-and-a session following the screening, Iram told the audience: “I felt that there are a lot of doctors and engineers in Pakistan, and there are not many storytellers. Everybody makes documentaries about Pakistan. I wanted my first feature-length film to be from Pakistan. We worked with a completely Pakistani cast and crew.”

In the year since, Josh has been screened in a number of other U.S. cities and has garnered much well-deserved acclaim, including the ARY Viewers Choice Award for best independent film. As of May 7 it is available on DVD and online through iTunes, Netflix, and Amazon. The ARY award, Iram told me on May 5, is “a sweet ending for the theatrical journey.”

But she continues to have aspirations for Josh and its impact. With the DVD release, Iram is hoping to reach a wider audience. “There were some really great screenings,” she told me. “More than ten of them sold out. So there are definitely more people who want to see it than saw it.” In particular, she hopes that Americans who lack personal exposure to Pakistan will see Josh. “I definitely feel satisfied in terms of the Pakistani diaspora,” she says. “In terms of the Western audience, not really. Western audiences need to watch it. It’s like a ticket to Karachi, a journey to Karachi in 100 minutes. It’s a very realistic portrayal of Pakistan; I pride myself on that. In some ways, I feel non-Pakistanis are a better audience for the film, and that’s why I’m looking forward to the DVD release.”

When I asked Iram about her hopes for the film’s impact, she reflected: “I don’t think that I’m trying to initiate a huge peace agreement, or anything like that. But it’s not really modest. You don’t know what type of wheels are going to turn in the viewer’s brain, and that could lead to a big change in someone’s life. What we can hope is that people consume our art and then move a bit. The more people watch it, the more people will maybe initiate a peace agreement or something.”

If making Josh was a journey for Iram as a first-time filmmaker, all the grassroots promotion she’s done has been another adventure in itself. Her enthusiasm and work ethic are impressive and make clear how strongly Iram believes – as well she should – in the value of her art.

“I think, as independent artists, we’re both artists and business people now,” she told me. “There’s no two ways about it, so you might as well embrace it. It’s very exhausting, but there’s a certain amount of empowering that can happen when you work from the ground up. And when you work from the ground up, you build a wide base for yourself. And then maybe even some of the people at the top start paying attention.”

Visit the Josh website to support independent Pakistani filmmaking by purchasing the DVD, or contact Iram to inquire about screenings.

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